Assessment of indoor cancer linked to accumulated radiation dose from different types of television sets in dwellings

Document Type: Original Research Paper

Authors

Department of Physics, Ibrahim Badamasi Babangida University, Lapai, Niger State, Nigeria

10.7508/pj.2015.03.009

Abstract

Exposure to radiation from different types of television sets was measured to ascertain the levels of hazards posed to the human biological system. Measurement of the annual radiation dose hazards was performed using a halogen-quenched GM tube with thin mica end window having a density of 1.5 mg/cm2, effective window diameter of 0.360 inch and side wall of 0.012 inch thick. The GM tube was placed for 180 minutes and the sensor faced the screens of the various TV sets, one meter apart. The annual radiation dose ranged from 0.012 ± 0.006 mSv/yr for plasma-SONY to 0.13 ± 0.012 mSv/yr for SHARP and SAMSUNG 24 inch TV sets, containing cathode ray tubes. The annual doses from the 15 and 24 inch-LG TVs (manufactured with cathode ray tubes) were relatively low, with values of 0.031 ± 0.017 and 0.035 ± 0.005 mSv/yr, respectively. The 21 inch THERMOCOOL and PROTECH (with cathode ray tubes), produced annual doses of 0.110 ± 0.052 Sv/yr and 0.063 ± 0.002 mSv/yr, respectively. This provides an insight into the amount of radiation generated by different TV sets in households, on an annual basis. After some years of exposure to TV radiation, health complications such as carcinogenesis or other adverse cellular events may occur, due to cumulated (but does not always) doses which may result in DNA damage, to the human biological system.

Keywords


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